SHARES

Long Island hospital scores Mount Sinai Hospital

One Gustave L Levy Pl., New York, NY 10029 Phone: 212-241-6500

Type: Acute Care Hospitals
Ownership: Voluntary non-profit - Private
Emergency Service: Yes
Cardiac Surgery Registry: Yes
Stroke Care Registry: Yes
Nursing Care Registry: Yes

Quality measure

These measures indicate how likely it is that patients will suffer from complications and deaths while in the hospital. The hospital's score is the number of times these events occur for every 1,000 patient discharges, either medical and surgical or just surgical. The government indicates how these scores compare to the national rate, but it does not release a specific national average for these measures.

Category Hospital's score Compared to national average
Fatal complications after surgery 128.24 No different than U.S. rate
Collapsed lung from exam or treatment 0.37 No different than U.S. rate
Post-op pulmonary embolism 8.25 Worse than U.S. rate
Wounds re-opening after operations 2.31 No different than U.S. rate
Accidental puncture or laceration 0.61 Better than U.S. rate
Patient safety overall 0.99 No different than U.S. rate

Mortality and re-admission rates

Mortality rates focus on whether patients died within 30 days of hospitalization. Readmission rates focus on whether patients were hospitalized again within 30 days. The rates shown here are per 1,000 patients and are based on people with Medicare who are 65 and older and take into account how sick patients were upon initial hospitalization. Death rates and rates of readmission show whether a hospital is doing its best to prevent complications, teach patients at discharge, and ensure patients make a smooth transition to their home or other setting.

Category Hospital's score Compared to national rate
Heart attack death rate 12.1 No different than U.S. rate
Heart attack readmission rate 17.6 No different than U.S. rate
Heart failure death rate 9.8 Better than U.S. rate
Heart failure readmission rate 23.4 No different than U.S. rate
Pneumonia 30-day death rate 15.6 No different than U.S. rate
Pneumonia 30-day readmission rate 17.2 No different than U.S. rate
Death rate for stroke patients 12.3 Better than U.S. rate
Death rate for COPD patients 6.3 No different than U.S. rate
Readmission rate for COPD patients 21.1 No different than U.S. rate
Readmission rate for hip/knee surgery patients 5.4 No different than U.S. rate
Rate of readmission after discharge from hospital 15.5 No different than U.S. rate
Readmission rate for stroke patients 14.3 No different than U.S. rate

Patient survey results

Results of a national, standardized survey of hospital patients created to publicly report the patient's perspective of hospital care. The survey asks a random sample of recently discharged patients about 10 important aspects of their hospital experience. Here are the percentages:

Questions Always Sometimes or never Usually
How often were the patients rooms and bathrooms kept clean? 67% 8% 25%
How often did nurses communicate well with patients? 76% 5% 19%
How often did doctors communicate well with patients? 80% 5% 15%
How often did patients receive help quickly from hospital staff? 62% 13% 25%
How often was patient's pain well controlled? 70% 7% 23%
How often did staff explain about medicines before giving them to patients? 59% 22% 19%
How often was the area around patients rooms kept quiet at night? 49% 19% 32%

Yes No
Were patients given information about what to do during their recovery at home? 84% 16%

6 or lower 7 or 8 9 or 10
How do patients rate the hospital overall? 8% 26% 66%

Probably or definitely not Yes Probably
Would patients recommend this hospital to family and friends? 5% 74% 21%

Process of care measures

These measures show how often hospitals give recommended treatments known to get the best results for patients with certain medical conditions or surgical procedures. Unless otherwise noted, the scores are percentages. Information about these treatments are taken from the patients' records and most are converted into a percentage; some scores are in minutes, where indicated. The measures are based on scientific evidence about treatments that are known to get the best results.

Measure Hospital's score National average Footnote
Fibrinolytic therapy given heart attack patients within 30 minutes of arrival Not Availab 55 2
Primary angioplasty given heart attack patients within 90 minutes of arrival Not Availab 95 1
Avg. minutes patients spend in ER before being admitted 534 280 2
Avg. minutes patients spend in ER after a decision has been made to admit them 299 99 2
Evaluation of left ventricular systolic function 100 98 2
Patients assessed and given immunization for influenza 99 94 2
Median time to fibrinolysis Not Availab 28 7
Avg. minutes patients spend in ER before leaving from visit 201 142 0
Outpatients with chest pain/possible heart attack who got drugs to break up blood clots within 30 minutes of arrival Not Availab 59 7
Avg. minutes patients spent in ER before seen by healthcare professional 38 23 0
Median time ER patients with broken bones waited for pain med 68 53 0
Percent of patients who left ER before being seen 3 2 0
Percent of stroke-symptom patients who receive head CT within 45 minutes 86 68 0
Median time to transfer to another facility for acute coronary intervention 66 57 0
Outpatients with chest pain/possible heart attack who got aspirin at arrival 95 97 0
Avg. number of minutes before outpatients with chest pain/possible heart attack got an ECG 5 7 0
Percent of newborns whose deliveries were scheduled early when not medically necessary 6 3 2
Pneumonia patients given the most appropriate initial antibiotics 92 95 2
Surgery patients on a beta blocker prior to arrival who received a beta blocker the period just before and after surgery 100 98 2
Prophylactic antibiotic received within 1 hour prior to surgical incision 99 99 2
Surgery patients given right kind of antibiotic to help prevent infection 99 99 2
Prophylactic antibiotics discontinued within 24 hours after surgery end time 99 98 2
Surgery patients whose urinary catheters were removed on first or second day after surgery 98 98 2
Patients treated at right time to help prevent blood clots after certain surgeries 100 100 2
Stroke patients treated to keep blood clots from forming within 2 days of admission 98 97 0
Ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke patients who were assessed for rehabilitation 100 98 0
Stroke patients discharged with meds to prevent complications caused by blood clots 100 99 0
Stroke patients with type of irregular heartbeat who got prescription for blood thinner 100 97 0
Stroke patients who got meds to break up blood clots within 3 hours of start 88 84 0
Stroke patients who got medicine to stop blood-clot complications within 2 days of arrival 98 98 0
Stroke patients needing meds to lower bad cholesterol given prescription at discharge 99 97 0
Stroke patients or caregivers who received written educational materials 99 94 0
Patients treated to prevent blood clots on day of or day after admission or surgery 89 94 2
Patients treated to prevent blood clots on day of or day after being admitted to ICU 91 97 2
Patients with blood clots who got the recommended treatment, including blood thinners 91 94 2
Patients with blood clots who were treated with an intravenous blood thinner and then checked for complications 99 99 2
Patients with blood clots who were discharged with blood thinner and written instructions 99 92 2
Incidence of potentially preventable blood clots in hospital 1 3 2
Hospitals not included:

Some hospitals are not listed in this database because they are exempt under the federal statute that provides for information collection. This was done because it was believed that their patient case-mix and cost structures would not be adequately reflected in the new system.

On Long Island, Syosset Hospital is exempt.

Footnotes:

1. The number of cases is too small to reliably tell how well a hospital is performing.

For each measure, the rate is the percent of patients for whom the treatment is appropriate. Where these numbers are small (fewer than 25 patients), the calculated rate may not accurately predict the hospital’s future performance. As the quality data base is expanded to a full rolling four quarters of data for each measure, the number of cases used to determine hospitals’ rates will likely increase, thereby increasing the reliability and stability of the rates. Note: This footnote does not necessarily reflect hospital size or overall patient volume.

2. The hospital indicated that the data submitted for this measure were based on a sample of cases.

A rate may be based upon the total number of cases treated by a hospital, or for a facility with a large caseload, a rate may be based on a random sample of the cases the hospital treated. This footnote indicates that a hospital chose to submit data for a sample of its total cases (following specific rules for how to the select the cases).

3. Data were collected during a shorter period (fewer quarters) than the maximum possible time for this measure.

Each rate reflects the care given over a specific time period, up to a maximum of four quarters during a 12 month period. The number of quarters of data available is determined by when hospitals first began to report data using a specific measure. For example, for the ten measures in the “Starter Set”, the maximum number of quarters for which a hospital could have provided data is four quarters. For measures added more recently, the maximum will be fewer than four quarters. This footnote indicates that the hospital's rate was based on data from fewer than the maximum possible number of quarters that the measure was generally collected.

4. Suppressed for one or more quarters by CMS.

Hospitals are required to submit accurate, reportable data to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). The rates for these measures were calculated by excluding data that had been suppressed for one or more quarters because they were identified as inaccurate.

5. No data are available from the hospital for this measure.

Hospitals volunteer to provide data for reporting on Hospital Compare. This footnote is applied when the hospital did not submit any cases for a measure.

6. Fewer than 100 patients completed the survey. Use these scores with caution, as the number of surveys may be too low to reliably assess hospital performance.

This footnote is applied when the number of completed surveys the hospital or its vendor provided to CMS is less than 100.

7. Survey results are based on less than 12 months of data.

This footnote is applied when survey results are based on less than 12 months of survey data.

8. Survey results are not available for this reporting period.

This footnote is applied when a hospital did not participate in the survey, did not collect sufficient survey data for public reporting purposes, or chose to suppress their survey results.

9. No or very few patients were eligible for the survey.

This footnote is applied when a hospital has no or very few patients eligible to participate in the survey and thus has no survey results to report.

10. A state average was not calculated because too few hospitals in the state submitted data.

This footnote is applied when too few hospitals submitted data.

11. There were discrepancies in the data collection process.

This footnote is applied when there have been deviations from survey data collection protocols. CMS is working with survey vendors and/or hospitals to correct this situation.

12. Very few patients were eligible for the survey. The scores shown reflect fewer than 50 completed surveys. Use these scores with caution, as the number of surveys may be too low to reliably assess hospital performance.

This footnote is applied when the number of completed surveys the hospital or its vendor provided to CMS is less than 50.

13. These measures are included in the composite measure calculations but Medicare is not reporting them at this time.

14. No data are available for publication from the hospital for this measure because there were zero central line days.

15. No data are available for publication from the hospital for this measure because this hospital does not have ICU locations.

In addition, the notation "0 patients" is applied when no patients met the criteria for inclusion in that particular measure’s calculation.

a. Source: Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) Survey.

b. This is the middle range of payments for the most typical cases treated in this geographic area for this condition or procedure.

c. Number of Medicare Patients Treated: The number of discharges the hospital treated for each MS-DRG for the current data collection period. The United States and average of Medicare Patients does not include hospitals with zero cases.

d. The payment and volume information is for acute care hospitals. Critical access hospitals (CAH) are not included because they are paid using another method.

e. Payment cannot be computed as there were no Medicare discharges for this MS-DRG for the current data collection period.

f. An asterisk (*) appears in the table where data cannot be disclosed to protect personal health information due to the small number of Medicare patients (fewer than 11).

g. This hospital is currently not submitting data for Hospital Process of Care Measures, Hospital Outcome of Care Measures and/or the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Health Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) Patient Survey.

h. This column shows the number of patients with Original Medicare who were admitted to the hospital for heart attack, heart failure or pneumonia conditions. The hospital may also have treated additional Medicare patients in Medicare health plans (like an HMO or PPO).

i. The number of cases is too small (fewer than 25) to reliably tell how well the hospital is performing.

j. Medicare requires hospitals to have at least 25 qualifying cases to have their results reported. This hospital had less than 25 cases.

Data Collection Periods:

For process of care measures and patient survey, the collection period is generally 12 months. As new measures are added, the collection period varies.

For the mortality and readmission measures, the collection period is 36 months. The 30-day risk-adjusted mortality and readmission measures for heart attack, heart failure and pneumonia are produced from Medicare claims and enrollment data.

The collection period for the patient safety measures is 20 months. The information is refreshed annually.

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